⭐ SALE ⭐ 20-30% OFF ON ALL WORKBOOKS3 DAYS FREE SHIPPING ⭐ FREE RETURNS ⭐

Fail to load the data
0

Anytime you are writing, you want to make sure that you are providing the most accurate information possible. This is because you want your reader to understand you as clearly as possible! Adverb clauses are a tool for you to use to write more clearly.

There are numerous forms of adverb clauses, which are discussed in depth in this guide. However, there are a few rules that much be true to an adverb clause to be correct.

Before we dig into the nuances and intricacies of adverb clauses, let’s first establish a working definition.

Adverbial Clauses Defined

Adverb clauses are a group of words that function as an adverb.

Remember, an adverb is a modifier meaning that modifies verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

An adverbial clause is similar and modifies sentences with more accuracy. The term clause is an indicator to you that it contains both a subject and a verb (meaning an adverbial clause is not a single word, but instead a short sentence).

The Three Requirements for Adverb Clauses

Three rules must be satisfied to use adverbial clauses correctly:

  1. Adverb clauses always contain a subject and a verb.
  2. Adverb clauses contain subordinate conjunctions that prevent them from being complete thoughts and sentences.
  3. All adverbial clauses answer one of the cornerstone questions, “How? When? Where? Etc.”

Examples

She walked like a baby deer.

Because of his experience in the field, they hired him immediately.

When she heard the news, she ran home.

Remember how we said that adverbs modified words? An example of this is:

Please knock on the door loudly. 

In this example, loudly is an adverb. If you wanted to increase detail, you could use an adverbial clause, which could read like this:

Please knock on the door as loud as possible in case I don’t hear you. 

Different Types of Adverbial Clauses

Beyond the basic definition of adverb clauses, there are many different kinds of adverbial clauses. These include adverbs of time, place, manner, comparison, reason, condition, and concession.

Each of these subtypes of adverbs uses signifying subordinating conjunctions to let the reader know what kind of adverbial clause it is.

6th Grade Common Core ELA (English Language Arts): Daily Practice Workbook
$19.99
By practicing and mastering this entire 6th grade English workbook, your child will become very familiar and comfortable with the state English exam and common core standards. This 6th Grade English Workbook includes: State Aligned Common Core Curriculum 20 Weeks of Daily Practice with Weekly Assessments 500+ Minutes of  Video Explanations 300+ 6th Grade ELA Questions Week 1 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 2 - Pronouns Week 3 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 4 - Phrases and Clauses, Commas and Conjunctions Week 5 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 6- Prefixes and Suffixes Week 7 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 8 - Capitalization, Greek Roots, Latin Roots Week 9 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 10 - Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement, Denotation and Connotation Week 11 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 12 - Transition Words, Commas and Conjunctions, Usage Errors Week 13 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 14 - Spelling Plurals Correctly Week 15 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 16 - Quotations, Spelling Rules, Usage Errors Week 17 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 18 - Punctuating Dialogue, Spelling Rules, Commonly Confused Words Week 19 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 20 - Other uses of words Argo Brothers Common Core ELA Workbook, Grade 6 Each question is labeled with the specific common core standard so both parents and teachers can use this workbook for their student(s). This workbook takes the Common Core State Standards and divides them up among 20 weeks. By working on these problems on a daily basis, students will be able to (1) find any deficiencies in their understanding and/or practice of English and (2) have small successes each day that will build competence and confidence in their abilities. Interested in 6th grade math? Click here.
Workbooks
Workbooks
7th Grade Common Core ELA (English Language Arts): Daily Practice Workbook
$19.99
By practicing and mastering this entire workbook, your child will become very familiar and comfortable with the state English exam and common core standards. This 7th grade English Workbook includes: State Aligned Common Core Curriculum 20 Weeks of Daily Practice with Weekly Assessments 500+ Minutes of  Video Explanations 300+ 7th Grade ELA Questions Week 1 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 2 - Phrases, Clauses, Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Week 3 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 4 - Simple, Compound and Complex Sentences, Week 5 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 6- Capitalization, Adjectives and Commas Week 7 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 8 - Spelling Practice Week 9 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 10 - Using Precise Language and Redundancy Week 11 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 12 - Context Clues Week 13 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 14 - Green and Latin Roots Week 15 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 16 - Allusions, Hyperbole, Metaphors and Similes Week 17 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 18 - Analogies Week 19 - Reading Comprehension Passages Week 20 - Connotation and Denotation Argo Brothers Common Core ELA Workbook, Grade 7 Each question is labeled with the specific common core standard so both parents and teachers can use this workbook for their student(s). This workbook takes the Common Core State Standards and divides them up among 20 weeks. By working on these problems on a daily basis, students will be able to (1) find any deficiencies in their understanding and/or practice of English and (2) have small successes each day that will build competence and confidence in their abilities. Interested in 7th grade math? Click here.
Workbooks
Workbooks

Below is a short explanation of each type of adverbial clause.

When?

Adverbs of time state when something is going to happen or how often you can expect something to happen.

While it’s not required, an adverb of time usually begins with subordinating conjunction:

after as as long as as soon as before
no sooner than since until when while

Where?

Adverbs of place explain where something is happening. It usually starts with a preposition or a subordinating conjunction (anywhere, everywhere, where, or wherever).

Why?

Any adverbs of reason aim to provide rationality for the main idea.

It will often start with “as”, “because”, “given”, or “since”.

What?

Adverbs of degree or comparison ask the question, “to what degree?”.

If you see any of the subordinating conjunctions like “than,” “as,” “so…as,” or “the…the,” you can safely assume you are reading an adverb of degree.

How?

An adverb of manner states how something is done. It usually starts with a subordinating conjunction, such as “as,” “like,” or “the way.”

If, Then?

An adverb of condition states the conditions which must be valid for the clause to come into effect.

These clauses are signified with the words “if” and “unless.”

In Spite Of

The final type of adverb is an adverb of concession. It is used to contract the main idea.

The critical signifiers of an adverb of concession are “though”, “although”, “even though”, “while”, “whereas”, and “even if”.

“When are We Going to Use This!?”

Adverbial clauses are helpful to understand because you can write more clearly.

However, there is another reason why understanding adverbial clauses are so important. When you understand adverb clauses, you’ll be able to use commas more correctly.

I remember when I was first learning commas at some point, I learned the classic “put a comma anywhere you would naturally take a breath while talking.”

Now that I have learned the actual rules for commas, I know that isn’t true. So what do adverbial clauses and commas have to do with each other?

When an adverbial clause is at the beginning of a sentence, then you should use a comma following the adverbial. This has an official name called a frontal adverbial. You can commonly see this happening in examples like:

And in conclusion, I think that commas should be used correctly. 

When your adverbial clause is at the end of a sentence, then generally, you will not use a comma.

Of course, there are exceptions to these rules. If you are writing an adverbial clause into the back-end of your sentence and you think a comma helps, add it!

Conclusion

As with any part of speech, adverbial clauses add richness to your writing. When you include adverb clauses, you can increase detail and, in result, improve understanding.

If you struggle with understanding parts of speech, grammatical, and usage rules, you may benefit from a workbook from ArgoPrep.

Subscribe for 6 months and you‘ll get
$59.
99
$179.99
save 67%

only $9.9983333333333 / month

 
  • 30,000+ Practice Questions
  • 500+ Video Lectures
  • 15,000+ Video Explanations
  • Printable Worksheets

ArgoPrep has worked with teachers to create a consistent practice that will help you improve your writing and understanding of the English language.

Whether you are trying to score higher on an assessment or trying to write more clearly, ArgoPrep has the resource to help you improve!

What do you think about this article? Share your opinion with us

Try ArgoPrep FREE for 1 month

Learn more

Share good content with friends and get 15% discount for 12-month subscription

Share in facebook Share in twitter
Check out our award-winning K-8 Math and ELA workbooks! Learn more

More than 500,000 parents, students and teachers use ArgoPrep.

Loading content ...
Loading failed...