⭐ COUPON: SALE2020 ⭐ 20% OFF ON ALL WORKBOOKS*3 DAYS FREE SHIPPING ⭐ FREE RETURNS ⭐

Fail to load the data
0

GRE Test Prep Book: Practice Tests + Quizzes + Strategies
$24.99
Argo Prep connects you with the knowledge, the strategies, and the practice you need to conquer the GRE. At Argo Prep, we understand how crucial getting into the right graduate program is to your long-term success, earnings, and satisfaction. We also recognize that the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) has become an obstacle for many brilliant and otherwise-qualified candidates for top graduate programs. That's why we're here to provide you - the driven, career-minded applicant - with the knowledge and skills necessary to dominate the GRE and put your best foot forward with top-tier admissions officers. This book is your comprehensive study guide for the GRE 2020-2021 Exam. Comprehensive Manual (Analytical Writing, Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning) 3 Full-Length Practice Exams (2 included in the book + 1 online) Video explanations for each online test question Free Online Support: By visiting argoprep.com you can chat with a tutor and have your questions answered. Higher Score Guaranteed This GRE Prep workbook covers:  Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: GRE Exam Structure Chapter 3: Introduction to Analytical Writing Chapter 4: How to Prepare: Analytical Writing Chapter 5: The Analyze an Issue Prompt Chapter 6: The Analyze an Argument Prompt Chapter 7: Introduction to Verbal Reasoning Chapter 8: Reading Comprehension Questions Chapter 9: Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence Questions Chapter 10: Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning Chapter 11: Math Primer Chapter 12: Practice Problem Set Chapter 13: Quantitative Comparison Chapter 14: Problem Solving and Data Interpretation Chapter 15: Writing Primer Chapter 16: Analyze an Issue: Model Essay Chapter 17: Analyze an Argument: Model Essay. GRE Practice Test 1 GRE Practice Test 2 Vocabulary Prefixes and Suffixes
Workbooks
Workbooks

Before we tackle more hard-level questions, make sure you’ve already gone through the three key strategies for sentence equivalence (SE) questions that we covered in an earlier post. (Also, if you have unknowingly stumbled upon this post independently, we advise backtracking and going through part 1, part 2, and part 3 of this entire series on hard SE questions.)

In the previous post, we ended with a difficult SE question containing multiple negatives. Let’s start by taking a look at that:


Given that the director’s usual attitude towards such matters cannot be characterized as ____________________, this measure of disapprobation was, to say the least, hardly expected.

A) complaisant

B) tendentious

C) critical

D) yielding

E) censorious

F) fickle

Let us apply the same strategy of breaking down the sentence into digestible bits by grouping together key phrases that relate to each other:


Given that the director’s usual attitude towards such matters cannot be characterized as ____________________, this measure of disapprobation was, to say the least, hardly expected.

A) complaisant

B) tendentious

C) critical

D) yielding

E) censorious

F) fickle

So

  1. This measure of disapprobation (if you don’t know the meaning, you can guess that it might be something negative, along the lines of disapproval or disagreement) was surprising.
  2. This means that it was expected that the director would agree or comply.
  3. Which means that his usual attitude is probably compliant, or easy-going or open-minded.
  4. Which further means that his usual attitude cannot be characterized as the opposite, i.e. difficult, contentious, opinionated (not positive).

Let’s take a look at our options:


A) complaisant (means “willing to please”, clearly positive—eliminate)

B) tendentious (not positive or negative—keep)

C) critical (not positive—keep)

D) yielding (clearly positive—eliminate)

E) censorious (not positive—keep)

F) fickle (not positive or negative—keep)

This means we are left with tendentious, critical, censorious and fickle.

From here, the steps of elimination are straightforward:

  1. Eliminate words that do not fit into the sentence context: the word fickle, while not clearly positive or negative, would not be associated with measures of disapprobation (strong disapproval); in fact, someone who is fickle is more likely to swing between decisions or make hasty choices. (Remaining choices: tendentious, critical, censorious)
  2. Eliminate words that do not form pairs: if you are unfamiliar with both tendentious and censorious, then you will have to make your most educated guess as to which pairs up with critical, or if both words pair up with each other.

Given that censorious seems most likely to be taken from the root word censor, we could advance a guess that the adjective refers to a tendency to censor, judge, criticize.

If tendentious has anything to do with tendency, then the adjective might refer to a predisposition, or an inclination towards a certain belief or value.

Hence your best guess at this stage would be critical and censorious; tendentious could work in the sentence context, but it does not pair up with the other two words.

Our guess, and indeed the correct answers: C (critical) and E (censorious).

(P.S. tendentious means expressing or intending to promote a certain cause or belief, while censorious means severely critical.)

If you benefitted from the above exercise, why not try solving the following very tricky question?


Historians have postulated that the poet resisted publishing these poems in her lifetime not because she was disgruntled with them, but because publication was aligned with print, whose normalizing tendencies she knew would ___________ her minute literary inflexions.

A) misconceive

B) miscarry

C) garble

D) obviate

E) deflect

F) trivialize

To check the solution to the above question and challenge yourself with more difficult SE questions, read on to part 5 of this series!

What do you think about this article? Share your opinion with us

ENTER BELOW FOR ARGOPREP'S FREE WEEKLY GIVEAWAYS. EVERY WEEK!
Great! You will receive an email from US shortly. Have a great day!
FREE 100$ in books to a family!
Error! Please try again!
SUCCESS
See Related Worksheets:
2nd grade
Skip Counting Through the Forest
Worksheets
 (0)
Among the tall trees, chirping birds, and babbling creek are numbers waiting to be counted in the Fr...
2nd grade
Writing Numbers in Different Ways with Peaceful Turtle
Worksheets
 (0)
Number concepts are greatly improved with transferring numbers from standard to expanded form and ba...
1st grade
Nests and Number Lines
Worksheets
 (0)
Tweet! Tweet! The sun is shining, the birds are chirping, and number lines are the focus of this wor...
1st grade
Which One is Longer?
Worksheets
 (0)
Students use shapes to help compare the size of the given pictures. How many happy faces does the ba...
1st grade
Hieroglyphs in Space
Worksheets
 (0)
Have you heard? The Mars rover found these mysterious shapes in space! Have students try to identify...
2nd grade
Leroy and Vivian Say, "Hello, Fellow Kids!"
Worksheets
 (0)
Honestly, fitting in is hard sometimes. Leroy and Vivian are familiar with the struggle, because alt...

Read More

Loading content ...
Loading failed...